A new vision of the son who went ahead…

 

As the years pass slowly by from the time of Cayden’s passing, my grief has begun to take on a different form. Well, perhaps not my grief, but my imaginings of my son.

Instead of imagining him as he was… wheelchair bound, deaf, and communicating with a computer, I now have lost that image in my mind somewhat.

Now, I see a healthy, tall, handsome, almost 12 year old boy, standing at the top of the stair steps that are my living children. Sometimes I feel his presence as we stand at church, and wish oh-so-much that I had a third hand to hold, a third blond head to pat (now almost as tall as me!) I understand now that the image of Cayden as he was… is slowly becoming Cayden as he is.

In Heaven we are promised perfect bodies. Not bodies that don’t work well. Not arms that twist funny because of mis-shapen elbows. Not ears that can’t hear with out cochlear implants, or a mouth that cannot speak because of muscular weakness.

In Heaven, we are promised perfect bodies. Strong healthy bodies. Bodies we cannot even imagine in their perfection. And if Cayden is in Heaven NOW, then NOW he has that perfect body. He IS that tall, handsome almost 12 year old boy. He IS that loving, gracious son I desperately miss. He IS singing praises to our creator, and hearing the angelic voices rise with his, at the actual foot of HIS throne.

Easter 2007So it makes perfect sense that my image of Cayden has changed. Morphed through time. I don’t imagine him at 12, curled in a wheelchair, with back and hip issues, eating through a tube, and possibly breathing through a trach, like so many of his 12 year old HPE friends. I cannot. That is not MY reality, nor is it Cayden’s reality.

I do remember him as he was… a bright, vivacious loving smiling four year old boy, just as I remember my daughter as she was… an adorable totally cute 2 year old girl, signing to her big brother. That is a lovely memory, but it is just that. A memory. A remembrance of how things were… not a reality of what they have become.

Instead, I have a complex daughter, who misses her big brother at times, and desperately wants him back. A daughter who was a sibling to a special needs child, (a tough job for sure), and has a vague recollection of that, but now she gets to see her mother grieve at strange and unexpected times, and feels it is her place to comfort me. I have a middle child, who was thrust into being the oldest against her will & her personality.

I also have a son, who is mad at the world that he didn’t get to meet his big brother. Who understands the story without a context, without really knowing what life was like back then. Who desperately wants to meet his big brother, but can’t begin to imagine what his life would be like if Cayden were still here.

Last Pics of CAnd I have a memory of a broken boy, who wanted so desperately to walk, to talk, and to run with his sister. Who is now running those fields of grace & streets of gold with the his miscarried siblings he alone gets to enjoy for now.

I look forward to our reunion. To hugging my first born son who is as tall and as strong as sons should be. A young man who is taller than his mom, and who looks after his siblings. God willing, that day will be here someday soon. Until then, I love on the kids I have with me, with so much love it hurts my heart at times.

My burden is sometimes hard to see, yet the image of Cayden is always there. The promise of a better place, a healing we cannot understand, and a future eternal with Christ and those we love.

2 Corinthians 5 :6-10, 17  teaches us that

So we are always of good courage. We know that while we are at home in the body we are away from the Lord,  for we walk by faith, not by sight. Yes, we are of good courage, and we would rather be away from the body and at home with the Lord. So whether we are at home or away, we make it our aim to please him.  For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each one may receive what is due for what he has done in the body, whether good or evil.

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come.

My imaginings are Biblical and they are real. They are the new reality I live within. That of missing my son daily, while each year changes the grief. It ebbs and fades, only to come crashing back at times like these. Tonight marks 7 years since I kissed him goodnight for the last time.

Shira

 

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A few of C’s favorite things… 28 Days of Cayden, Day 25

I thought I’d change gears and write some fun stuff about Cayden. I’ve said how he was such a fun and super kid, but he really was! He was a sweet sweet boy who definitely had personality. His personality really blossomed when he began to hear, and just kept getting bigger!

Mommy & C

Mommy & C, last Mother’s Day as an only child.

He loved his Momma. I know, I put myself first. But really, Cayden was a momma’s boy! He was always with me, more than a typical child would be, and really I loved hanging out with him. I liked watching his wheels turn as he tried to learn new things. Watching him persevere until he could do something new. I really tried to treasure every moment I had with him, as we knew from the beginning he was probably not going to be our child forever. Ironically, now he is a forever child, forever 4.

upside down

Silly play with Daddy was always good for giggles!

Cayden loved his Daddy too, but in different ways. I said before, Daddy was for sleeping and napping. He was for watching NASCAR, and for playing airplane. Daddy was definitely NOT for eating. He started this behavior after Skylar was born and needed her newborn attention. Cayden realized that if he didn’t eat for Daddy, Mommy HAD to come and spend some time with him to feed him.  I would feed him a few bites… no problem. Joey would pick up the spoon to feed him a few bites… no eating! He literally would snap his mouth shut and turn away. It was somewhat funny to me because he was communicating loud and clearly. Joey, however, thought it was more frustrating than funny.  Don’t tell me that kid wasn’t smart! This stubbornness lasted for at least a year or more. Really. No food with Dad!

Elmo coloring

Working hard on his Elmo picture while standing.

Cayden loved to color. After we got his stander, the favorite activity by far was coloring. He loved it. He would color for an hour if you let him. We would choose a picture to color together. I would pick a handful of markers and allow him to choose which he wanted. We’d put the marker in his hand, and as I mentioned before, he would push the marker back and forth to color the area. He would color the ENTIRE section in, and if he missed a spot, he worked really hard to fill that little hole in. If he slid & went out of the lines, he would fuss, and if I couldn’t calm him down, he would stop, throw the marker down & turn his head away, clearly saying without words “This one is ruined. I need a new one!” My little perfectionist! His favorite thing to color was from his Elmo coloring book & he would always color things exactly the color they were in real life. Elmo is red, Big Bird is yellow. Pumpkins are orange. Apples are red. He was quite specific. Then one day, he colored a zebra blue and orange– a break through! He was finally getting a little creative! Yay!

C on vibrating seat

C watching TV on his vibrating chair pad. Like many deaf children, he loved vibrations of all kinds.

Cayden loved his movies! He watched a lot of movies with all of our driving around. How else was I to keep a hearing impaired child with very little arm mobility busy on 3+ hour drives? I’m not sure how much he understood, not being able to hear the movies, but many are pretty easy to understand even without sound. And he would often giggle at just the right places, so I think they made sense to him. First it was anything Elmo, all Elmo, all the time. Then Baby Einstein videos; we would do his listening therapy while he watched these videos with no sound. Very good for visual therapy! He loved Monsters Inc., Toy Story, and Cars, particularly Cars. Lightning McQueen was his favorite. He died before most of these movies had sequels, but I’m certain Planes would have been his recent favorite!

Cayden loved vibrations. Anything that vibrated was a hit with Cayden. From toys, to cushions, to chair pads, to extra loud speakers at church, he grinned when he could feel the floor or the earth move. Like many deaf children, this is a great way for them to interact with their world, and to get some sensation of hearing (without needing aids). We tried to use this to his advantage as much as we could, and I always looked for toys and things that would help him in this area. Baby toys are good for this, so are ‘old lady’ chair cushions & back  or foot massagers.

Monkey C

C swinging in his Halloween costume at a friend’s party.

Cayden loved to move. Especially to feel the wind in his hair (or on his bald head!). Anything we could do that would give him that sensation of wild movement, with strong vestibular input, he LOVED. He would giggle and ask for more. Swinging was fun. Twisting the swing up as far as it would go was better. Twisting the swing, then pushing it sideways, so it would go crazy while spinning was the BEST! I guess driving the power chair was about the best feeling he’d ever had. One day we were practicing, and I was trying to get him to drive up the street. Instead, he kept going into the neighbor’s yards. Bouncing over the bumpy yards was so much more fun (& more input) than driving on the smooth street. He knew he shouldn’t be driving in their yards, but he couldn’t help himself! Offroading in the power chair! I could see the mischief in his eyes as he giggled the whole way, driving so fast, I had to run to keep up. Wee HA!

C on Sammy

Working on arm, neck and torso strength while doing equine-assisted occupational therapy. It also was great for his hips and legs.

 

Cayden loved his horses. We started Cayden on hippotherapy (equine assisted therapy) which was for him considered his OT. He started this around 3 years old and rode until he passed away. He loved to ride, and weekly we would take the long drive to the barn.  The best part for me, was watching him get so excited the moment we turned onto the gravel road that led to the barn. He would arch and pull at his carseat, trying to jump out of the chair. He knew that he was going to get to ride, to pet and groom the horses, and maybe pet the bunny. Sometimes he got to bounce on the trampoline too! So much fun!.

When he began riding at Shining Hope Farms, he could not hold up his head. If I held him on my hip, he would flop backwards, unable to hold up his torso. After 9 months of weekly hippotherapy, he could. I could hold him on my hip without struggling. He could keep his head up to meet your eyes. He wasn’t always staring at his wheelchair tray. He progressed! Then we moved and quit riding for a while, until we found a new barn. At Wings of Eagles Ranch Cayden got to take therapeutic riding lessons with a class. He played fun horse games like leapfrog, and trotting around poles. Putting beanie babies in matching houses and other fun activities. He loved the interaction with the other kids and especially loved the games. It was as much work as at Shining Hope, but more fun!

 

newborn S

This has to be the sweetest picture of sibling love ever.

Cayden loved his sister. From the moment he saw her at the hospital, Cayden was smitten with his baby sister. He loved her and loved to watch her. As she got bigger, she would play with him, bring him toys, toddle around on his chairs or standers. She would push him in the wheelchair when she started walking. She adored him and I loved watching their relationship develop. Skylar went to all his therapy sessions and sat quietly and played. Sometimes she would blurt out the answers that Cayden had to work so hard to find the words for. The frustrated looks he would give her were priceless! But she would sit with him, ‘read’ to him, sign with him… it really was a sweet friendship.

S reading to C

Skylar ‘reading’ to Cayden. She had memorized the books and would tell him the stories. Such a sweet memory!

She was with me when we went to wake him up that fateful morning, and just didn’t understand why he wouldn’t wake up and giggle at her like he usually did. Skylar had preschool that morning, so we sent her to school, so we could handle the situation and the grief. We ended up making the hard decision to not have her see his body again, but when we went to get her from grandma’s after school, she immediately said “Where’s CC?” and the explanation had to begin. She didn’t understand life without him, and oh, how hard it was to explain death to a 2 1/2 year old.

I hated the fact that my child died so young, but we had been preparing for that day from before he was born. We had already grieved and cried and gone through so many of the ‘what if’s’ that when the dreadful day came, we weren’t completely unprepared. We never really thought we’d have as long as 4 1/2 years with him. We really thought we’d get only a few hours to know him. But Skylar didn’t know that. We hadn’t shared that possibility with her. But now we had to! It was hard! It is hard!

I hated that the death of my child, exposed so many of our friends’ children to their first experience with death. Our playgroup, our church friends, our other friends, so many had young children, and we had to explain it, or their parents had to explain why Cayden wasn’t here anymore.  I always explained that Cayden had gone to be in Heaven with Jesus, and could walk and talk and run now, that he was perfectly healed. Perhaps it’s good for children to hear the gospel at that young of an age, the truth of Heaven, but I hated that I was the bearer of that harsh reality because of my child’s death.

How do I know that he is with Jesus? you might ask.

The Bible tells us in 2 Corinthians 5:1, 6-8

For we know that if the earthly tent we live in is destroyed, we have a building from God, an eternal house in heaven, not built by human hands. Therefore, we are always confident and know that as long as we are at home in the body, we are away from the Lord. We live by faith, not by sight. We are confident, I say, and would prefer to be away from the body and at home with the Lord. 

We have a home in Heaven, an eternal house, built by Christ. We can be confident that to be away from the body (that is, dead), we are at home with the Lord.

In Revelation 21:3-5, it says it again:

“Look! God’s dwelling place is now among the people, and he will dwell with them. They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and be their God. ‘He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death’ or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.”

He who was seated on the throne said, “I am making everything new!” Then he said, “Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.”

How can we be sad at Cayden’s death, when it means for him, to be at home eternally with the Lord? To be made brand new! With a new body not made by human hands. Knowing this, being confident in this, I cannot have a heavy heart. Cayden is made new. He is at his eternal home. Someday, I will join him and we will rejoice together, celebrating birthdays for eternity with Jesus.

Shira

More about Heaven tomorrow…

 

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