The long road to walking… 28 Days of Cayden, Day 23

Roll, crawl, toddle, walk. Such a normal progression. So normal, so natural most moms don’t question it, or even really think about it. They may compare their kids to their peers, and wonder, “When will my child crawl, climb, walk?” but they don’t usually think, “If only my child could _______.”

This week I’ve shared with you the myriad of devices needed to keep him supported, safe, and seated, but we haven’t talked about walking at all! You may be thinking, another post about research and trials and blah blah blah. This was my life, people. This was what I DID! It was my job, as Cayden’s mom, to figure out how to help him do these things, because just bringing him to the playground didn’t work. I am sick of writing about it after 7 days, think of how tired I was of it after 4 years!

Bear with me one more day & I promise I will change focus for the last 5 days…

I will just go through the progression towards walking and explain how we tried to get C to work through it, some phases had success, others not. All of them were hard for Cayden, and all required some sort of device.

C rolling on ball

Practicing rolling on the ball was a little more fun than the wedge, but still not well liked by Cayden.

Rolling: Ball

Cayden HATED rolling. Yes, all caps, all italic. This is greatly emphasized, I probably cannot emphasize it enough, just how much he HATED rolling. And the therapists (God bless the Amy’s, they really were great!) worked non-stop in trying to get him to be able to roll. Down a ramp. On the mat. On a ball. It was miserable. Try doing therapy with a kid who couldn’t hear, probably couldn’t see much. How do you explain to him what you want and let him know he won’t fall? We used fans and vibrating toys to try to encourage him to do what we wanted, but it was so hard!

Dad & C

Rolling for Grampy with tickles at the end, made the ball work a bit more bearable.

Every time we tried to roll, he would cry. He hated the sensation of falling & had a strong startle reflex. If he was laying on the bed and a breeze went past, he would flail as if he were falling. So rolling down a long incline ramp seemed like falling down a mountainside. That is all I can figure. I worked on it at home on the ball, daily.  We worked at this weekly at therapy for years & finally at some point, I said to the physical therapist, “Please, let’s just stop. Let’s move onto something else. This is torture for him.”

C creepster Crawler

Determined & Focused!

Crawling: Creepster

Did you know there is a special device made just to help kids learn to crawl? Several varieties actually. We found one at the equipment lending library called the Creepster Crawler. This was a cool thing, that suspended Cayden above the floor while allowing him to use his arms & legs to move, in the manner of crawling. It helped to build arm strength, head control & the basic back and forth rhythm of crawling.IMG_2467

His elbow malformations made this a bit difficult & it was HARD for him to do, but he worked hard in it and seemed to enjoy the feeling of ‘flying.’ This piece of equipment was given to us by an aquantaince, but it was a little too big for Cayden. We made it work, but it certainly was WORK!

 

pony

The pony loaner was a good option, but a little big, so hard for him to move.

Toddling: Pony

The gait trainer is the special needs kid version of toddling. It is a semi-supported walking device that allows them to partial bear weight & stand without having to support their full body weight. Again, blessed by the equipment lending library, were able to demo a pony gait trainer. This worked quite well for Cayden, and he enjoyed spending time in it. It was another way for him to be vertical, and to stand at his height rather than sit. He never complained about spending time in it, but he never really got moving in it either. It became sort of a resting spot for him, rather than a piece of exercise equipment. Because of that, we decided to go a different route on his personal walker.

c napping in pony

Cayden enjoyed being in the pony. It was so comfy, sometimes he would have a catnap in it!

 

 

Walking: Pacer

So many choices of kid’s walkers, but none really seemed to be great. Anything that is fully supportive was so big and bulky and our house was getting full! The kid walk was interesting, it supported him in a similar fashion to the stander, but it was hard to get him into it, being as floppy as he was. He had a hard time moving it anywhere also, and then its legs often got in the way.

We ended up with the rifton walker/gait trainer. It was adjustable for height as well as for capability. A supportive seat helped him  bear weight in his floppy legs, he could rise & push, then sit and rest. It also had a tray for his ECO-13, arm rests, & it was sturdy.

IMG_0002 1

The ‘Go Blue!’ Rifton Pacer fully loaded & with the supportive seat.

This was Cayden’s ‘Go Blue!’ He was so excited about getting this, after we did a trial at therapy, he was ready to go & walk! As you know by now, the approval and processing time was about 6 months, so he was talking about it for a long time before we got it. The day of delivery finally arrived. The vendor came to the house to deliver it, and fit it to Cayden. It was an afternoon delivery, I think we were his last client of the day. One big problem, he forgot the supportive seat at the warehouse, which was about an hour away. So he told me “Sorry, I will have to bring it back by at a later date.” HMPH. I was supposed to tell Cayden that he had to just look at this long-awaited walker and not be able to use it for another week? Sorry, but no. I became a Momma Bear and told him, ‘No, it was a mistake, but your mistake. I am not going to allow you to punish my son, you will fix it and make it better. You will bring it back tonight. Sorry, but you are working late.’ Pretty sure he didn’t like me much after that! But he did go get it and fit it that night.

cmas 2007

‘Standing’ with his little sister on Christmas day.

For the uninitiated, dealing with equipment vendors is a very large pain in the rear. They are overbooked, probably underpaid, they always seem to put off delivering much-needed equipment, & usually forget things or tools to properly adjust the gear. They insist that they are the only ones capable of properly adjusting the devices, so you always have to wait for an appointment to get things fixed. Joey & I quickly learned how to adjust the pieces ourselves, so we didn’t have to wait on them, but they usually didn’t like us very much for it. However, we had a young child, who was obviously going to need DME for his lifetime, and they didn’t want to lose us as clients, because we could make them a lot of money over the years. I also learned, from the fiasco with the bath chair, that they get better commissions on certain devices and brands, & will push those items whether they are a good choice for your child or not. Advocacy and learning to speak up loudly for your child, is the only way to make this process a success.

The Go Blue walker was a great piece for Cayden. He enjoyed being in it, but it was really hard work. We would bribe him with pudding, oreos, tickles, toys. Each step he’d get a small bite of chocolate pudding, or oreos. We would promise the best movie if he’d make it around the kitchen. Hard hard work. He needed help in lifting and moving his legs forward, but if positioned properly, he would push with the best of efforts. Tiny steps, tiny progress.

Healing

One day Peter and John were going up to the temple at the time of prayer—at three in the afternoon. Now a man who was lame from birth was being carried to the temple gate called Beautiful, where he was put every day to beg from those going into the temple courts. When he saw Peter and John about to enter, he asked them for money. Peter looked straight at him, as did John. Then Peter said, “Look at us!” So the man gave them his attention, expecting to get something from them.

Then Peter said, “Silver or gold I do not have, but what I do have I give you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, walk.” Taking him by the right hand, he helped him up, and instantly the man’s feet and ankles became strong. He jumped to his feet and began to walk. Then he went with them into the temple courts, walking and jumping, and praising God. When all the people saw him walking and praising God, they recognized him as the same man who used to sit begging at the temple gate called Beautiful, and they were filled with wonder and amazement at what had happened to him. (Acts 3:1-10)

Now is the time when I say just how great his progress was & “Praise God! Cayden jumped to his feet and began to walk!” Right? That is the history of Cayden’s vision and hearing and talking miracles. It was not the case with walking. He never had the opportunity to walk here on this earthly ground unsupported, unattached.

The truth of the matter is that I don’t think that he would have been able to walk unsupported, ever. His tone was just too floppy, his legs too weak. I think he was progressing toward getting somewhat mobile, but truthfully I think as he made strides in the power chair, he would have just wanted to spend the time working on the speed of the chair, rather than the more turtle-like pace of the walker. And who could blame him?

But here is the great miracle. The last night Cayden spent on earth, his grandparents were babysitting. The bedtime story they read to the kids was from Cayden’s Read with Me Bible & THIS was the story.

A Man Who Could Not Walk (Mark 2; Luke 5)

One day Jesus was teaching. Some men came carrying a man who could not walk. But they could not get him close to Jesus because of the crowd. They made a hole in the roof above Jesus. Then they lowered the man through it on a mat. They lowered him into the middle of the crowd, right in front of Jesus.

When Jesus saw they had faith, he said to the man who could not walk, “Get up. Take your mat and go home.” Right away, the man stood up. He took his mat and went home praising God. All the people were amazed. They praised God and said, “We have never seen anything like this!” 

My parents said that Cayden was so thrilled by this story. He was giggling and cooing and jabbering after it. In my heart, I firmly believe that Cayden understood this story, and understood that healing was possible through faith. I think his prayer that night was to be healed, to be made whole, so when Jesus called his name that night, Cayden KNEW in his heart that if he went, he would be able to stand up, go to his heavenly home and praise God.

Our son is healed. He is whole. He is dancing in fields of grace. As 2 year old Skylar said, He sits in the lap of Jesus, singing ‘Jesus Loves Me.’ Cayden is now made perfect in Christ, hearing, seeing, singing, dancing, running. His chains are gone. He’s been set free.

Shira

IMG_5289

The healed paraplegic from the Children’s Bible, praising God!

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s